Orthotics for Bunion

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4.3out of 5
Worsened(1)
Not improved(6)
Improved(5)
Almost cured(2)
Cured(8)
  • Carrie Bunion

    • Age 35-54
    • Female
    • 155 lbs
    • 5' 5"
    • Nashville , tn
    28
    Jun2018
    • Injury Status In Pain
    • Physical activity per week 4-8 hours
    • Chronicity 18+ Months
    • Repeat injury? No

    Treatment Ratings

      Not Improved
      Orthotics, Supportive Shoes,

    Would like to find a cure without surgery


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  • SCDC Bunion

    • Age 35-54
    • Male
    • 225 lbs
    • 6' 1"
    • Taylors, sc
    15
    May2018
    • Injury Status In Pain
    • Physical activity per week 8+ hours
    • Chronicity 6-18 Months
    • Repeat injury? No

    Treatment Ratings

      Improved
      Orthotics, Bunion pad/bootie, Toe Separator, Bunion Splint, Rest, Ice, Footwear Modification,
      Not Improved
      Cortisone Injection, Bunion socks, Proper Running Form, Supportive Shoes,
      Worsened
      Taping

    Daily life is unaffected. Walking becomes very painful on the bunionettes by mile 3 and bunions by mile 5.


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  • blah88 Bunion

    • Age n/a
    01
    Feb2016
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      Massage, Supportive Shoes, Toe Separator, Proper Running Form
      Not Improved
      Orthotics

    This is a topic I unfortunately have a wealth of experience with. I suffered a basketball injury to my right foot ~10 years ago that left me with a bunion and hallux rigidus (stiff big toe). I've accepted that it will never heal, but I've learned how to manage it so that it has virtually no impact on me running 80 miles/week.

    First things first - I would advise against the Nike Frees. I tried the 3.0 three years ago, and while they felt great (light and fast), they were a major factor in me developing a significant foot injury (capsulitis) that left me unable to walk without pain for a year. I thought that I'd never run again. Because of the Free's last, I inadvertently began overusing the outside of my right foot, resulting in my big toe (with the bunion) not doing its share of the work. The first sign, which I promptly ignored, was peroneal tendonitis along the outside of the right calf. I foam-rolled / "sticked" it away and continued running high mileage. Then the ball of my right foot swelled up and running became impossible.

    I saw several orthopedic surgeons, a couple physical therapists, bought two expensive pairs of orthotics, and finally relearned how to use my big toe after a trying year.

    I've learned that I need to do the following to keep my foot fully functional:

    *Always be aware of my gait when walking and running. Proprioception is a funny thing in that you can sometimes lose it without knowing. I now periodically "check in" with my foot to make sure I feel the big toe pushing off and taking on about 2/5 of the load.

    *Stick with lightweight stability shoes. I like New Balance because the toe box is typically fairly wide. The 90x series was great for me and I use the 1190 now. The Saucony Mirage is another one I've had success with. You may require a different shoe, but I'd recommend sticking with some support, although you don't have to go over 10 ounces.

    *Interestingly, I now depend on the Correct Toes by Dr. Ray McClanahan. I tried a couple of the cheap spacers before, but the fact I can slap some socks and shoes on top of these make them well worth the expensive price. I wear them all day and night except for when I'm running or doing some other moderate physical activity.

    *I have to spend about 5 minutes pre-run and preferably 20 either post-run or in the evening massaging my foot and finger-spacing my toes. My left hand spaces and my right thumb goes in between and massages the knots/bubbles out of the ball of my foot near the big toe area. I also wiggle the big toe around a bit while it makes all kinds of arthritic cracking noises to try to keep the range of motion that I have left.

    That's about all I can think of at the moment.


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  • Marca Bunion

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    01
    Feb2016

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics, Surgery

    My husband had bunions on both feet until the chiropractor fitted him for orthotics which corrected his arch, etc. That improved both, one almost completely. The other was too far advanced to be totally corrected without surgery so he had a bunionectomy a year ago. It was pretty painful and recovery time was about what is to be expected for surgery but he is doing SO well now!!! Much less back pain and more mobility!!! Hope this helps!!


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  • tjinak Bunion

    • Age 35-54
    • Female
    01
    Feb2016
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Improved
      Orthotics

    I've endured bunions since high school, now 44. I am a runner and afraid that if I have the surgery that my running days will be over. I've read such mixed comments about the efficiency. Some folks talk about losing flexion in the joint between the toe and metatarsals. Using orthotics has helped with the pain but less so each year. As others have commented finding shoes is really tough, so long super cute stylish shoes, even flats! I find NAOT shoes to be comfortable and cute with lots of support on the metatarsals which seems most important.


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  • jarviscera Bunion

    • Age 35-54
    • Male
    01
    Feb2016
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Improved
      Supportive Shoes
      Worsened
      Orthotics

    I have had bunions for about 10 years. They got worse as I began running more, and started preventing me from running. I used expensive custom cork/foam orthotics for 4 years until I realized that they had allowed my feet to grow weaker instead of stronger. Then I began transitioning to less supportive and wider footwear with less of a built up heel. The reasoning for this was that by slowly introducing less supportive footwear, my feet would grow stronger. The idea with wide shoe is to not smash and irritate the bunions, and the idea with the low heel is to lessen indirect pressure from body weight. I currently treat my bunions by wearing foot shaped, "zero drop" (no heel lift whatsoever) Altra brand running shoes, and sometimes Vibram Five Finger shoes to separate my toes and help to straighten them. The issue is still there, but it doesn't bother me as much as it used to. I'd love to eliminate the issue, but at least it's manageable.


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  • Lisa Bunion

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    01
    Feb2016

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Bunion pad/bootie
      Not Improved
      Orthotics, Bunion Splint

    Six months ago I booked a trip to Europe at my husband's prompting. As the trip grew closer, I was scrambling to find shoes and then later insoles that would help with all the walking I knew I was going to be doing. I tried Dr. Scholl's insoles, a silicone protector that I bought at Bed, Bath and Beyond and a brace that you wear at night. Nothing helped. I just happened to be searching on Amazon for anything else that might help when I came upon the Dr. JK product. I got them about 8 days before my trip. http://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Protector-Corrector-Separators-Straightener/dp/B011VNFF4A/

    There are 5 different types/sets of bunion protectors included in the kit and I experimented with them, wearing them to work and walking my dog. They are made of a very soft material with no rough edges and are very soft on the feet. The one I found that seemed to align my big toe the way I think it should be and also protected the bunion from rubbing against my shoe, was the one they recommend for hiking. At first I just used it on my right foot, the one with the bunion but because this particular type wraps around all 5 toes, top and bottom of foot, my left foot kind of felt like the odd man out. So I decided to try it also on the foot without the bunion to see if it would make my feet feel the same in both shoes. It did and so I wore them this way when I went to Europe.


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  • JAS Bunion

    • Age n/a
    01
    Feb2016

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics

    from my own perspective, another non-invasive way is to be fitted with orthotics by a specialist (i.e. NOT store bought)...I put off having the surgery knowing the risks and rehab associated and when eventually, the pain was so intense, had to bite the bullet and attend a local orthopaedic specialist (a man of integrity) he advised that 'yes, he could ' but referred me to a specialist in the field of orthotics' - have NEVER looked back since my first set that fit into all my shoes.


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  • neimad19 Bunion

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    01
    Feb2016
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics

    I've got Bunions and have had them since I was a early teenager. They would constantly give me grief, especially after a long day of walking or hiking which is what I love doing. My mother, and her grandmother has them so I'm assuming there is some sort of hereditary connection there, but wearing narrow shoes definitely contributes to the problem too. So avoid narrow shoes if you can. I find leather shoes are the best as they soften over time and mould to the shape of your foot, instead of contorting your foot to the shape of the shoe as most cheap shoes do these days. About 1 year ago I went to see a Podiatrist. She diagnosed me with very flat, nearly non existent arches and pronounced knees and prescribed custom made insoles to put in my shoes. I shit you not, within 2 weeks my bunions stopped hurting. I know it seems like some ridiculous tv infomercial that sounds to good to be true, but it's legit...no more pain. My flat arches and pronounced knees means I used to put alot of pressure on the ball of my foot under my big toe (right below the bunion) instead of distributing the weight of my body evenly across my whole foot. This aggravates the bunion, surrounding nerves, surrounding tendons and the big toe joint which contributes to the bunion growing in size and the pain it gave me. Since I've gotten the insoles however, the pain has 99% gone. There were a few times when it felt tender after 15km+ hiking through mountains, but that's to be expected of even healthy feet. I've heard surgery isn't always successful and can be quite painful. If the cosmetic issue of bunions doesn't bother you and you just want to get rid of the pain, I HIGHLY suggest talking to a Podiatrist about correct insoles for your feet.


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  • HeathEarnshaw Bunion

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    01
    Feb2016

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Not Improved
      Orthotics

    I have what my podiatrist called "slight" bunions and I have very high arches so maybe that affects things differently. The podiatrist gave me a pair of orthotics that give me arch support but I rarely wear them... I can't feel the difference to be honest. What matters a lot to my comfort is having some wiggle room in the toe box, good foot flexion if walking long distance, and decent shock absorption (via padded insoles if necessary). With low arches you might have slightly different needs. Mostly though I can wear any flat or low heeled shoe in normal widths. I love heels but anything over 2.5 inches hurts my feet after a few hours... all my weight inevitably lands on the ball of my foot right where my bunions are. So unless it's a special occasion, I don't do high heels anymore.


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  • 01
    Feb2016

    Treatment Ratings

      Not Improved
      Orthotics

    I have bunions as well and super flat feet and did at one point use the orthotics. I actually had the bunion removal surgery on my left foot when I was 15 (I could feel the growth through the bottom of my foot...it was unpleasant and weird). I honestly don't know if the orthotics were effective because I used to wear them all the time and I can tell you I still have one on my right foot and to some extent it's grown a bit on my left foot. The orthotics I had definitely couldn't be used in heeled shoes as they were meant to lay flat. I feel like only shoes like Birkenstocks or just walking bare foot all the time are the only way to keep the toes from being more wedged into a shoe shape.
    When I used to run I would wear Nike Frees and that felt much better to me than running shoes with a lot of support. When I had the shoes with a lot of support it felt like I couldn't feel my natural motion of my foot and I was just slamming it down.
    If you feel like the bunions are bothering you so much you could consider surgery but it definitely was no in and out procedure for me.


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  • Sandy Bunion

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    03
    Sep2014
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured