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Runner's Knee (PFPS)

Top Rated Treatments for Runner's Knee (PFPS)

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  • katie Runner's Knee (PFPS)

    • Age < 18
    • Female
    • 149 lbs
    • 5' 2"
    • Canada, Ontario
    27
    Feb2018
    • Injury Status In Pain
    • Physical activity per week 0-4 hours
    • Chronicity 0 - 6 Months
    • Repeat injury? Yes
      Not Improved
      Physical Therapy, Ice, Cortisone Injection, Acupuncture, Rest, Brace, Taping,

    In august I had taken a step over somethings and had heard a pop in my knee and couldn't walk on it, I had gone to the hospital as it has also automatically swelled up, like you couldn't even see my patella (knee cap) and they had prescribed me toradol and was on that, crutches and immobilizing brace for about 2 months from mid August to mid October. I then saw our orthopaedic surgeon and he said my MRI was clean and that I had PatelloFemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) and to try physiotherapy. I then went to physio and my therapist was positive that it wasn't pfps.. but anyways we continued with physio and I did it for twice a week for 8 weeks. After the eighth week we decided to get another opinion on my knee as it wasnt helping and why go to something expensive twice a week for something that's not helping? So I saw another ortho surgeon in Brampton and he said I had good mobility but my knee was still extremely inflamed and was still having lots of pain so he figured a cortisone shot would be the best approach so that's what we had done. I had my shot on January 30th and after it he said he thought that it would be good from now on and not to suspect of anymore more problems.. but 3 weeks after I woke up one morning not able to bend, straighten my leg or able to weight bare at all... so, here I am again waiting to see the ortho surgeon to see what the next step is, and my knee is in just as bad position as it was before i had gotten my cortisone shot.

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  • Anonymous Runner's Knee (PFPS)

    • Age 35-54
    • Female
    • 230 lbs
    • 5' 7"
    • Phoenix Arizona
    24
    Nov2016
    • Injury Status Recovering
    • Physical activity per week 0-4 hours
    • Chronicity 18+ Months
    • Repeat injury? No
    • Pain with prolonged sitting Standing
    • Doctor/Care Giver Fierro
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Cross training, Strengthening Exercises, Stretching, Supportive Shoes, Brace, Rest, Massage, Platelet Rich Plasma Injection, Ice, Physical Therapy, Supplements
      Worsened
      Other

    Is just little reliefs

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  • tawandacat Runner's Knee (PFPS)

    • Age 55+
    • Female
    • 145 lbs
    • 5' 7"
    • Binalong Bay, Tasmania
    22
    Sep2016
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Physical activity per week 8+ hours
    • Chronicity 6-18 Months
    • Repeat injury? No
      Cured
      Barefoot Shoes, Proper Running Form
      Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Strengthening Exercises, Cross training
      Not Improved
      Orthotics
      Worsened
      Supportive Shoes

    I had been running for years in really cushioned shoes (Asics Nimbus) When I was in my 30's I developed a sharp pain in my heels. I fixed this problem with orthotics as it was a quick fix to my problem. I ran with these orthotics in very cushioned shoes for 20 years. Then in my mid 50's I developed runners knee. I couldn't run anymore it hurt too much. So I started bike riding. I found that if I pointed my feet outwards (externally rotating the leg) when I peddled, it didn't hurt my knees. I took this concept back to my running. I read the book "Born to Run" By Christopher McDougall. I discovered that really padded running shoes gives the body a false sense of protection. When the brain doesn't perceive danger it does nothing to protect itself from repetitive actions like running with the knees misaligned as in my case, despite the orthotics. I switched to a mid barefoot shoe and got rid of the orthotics. I found the idea of using my feet and having a better connection to the ground profoundly interesting and helpful. I became very interested in posture and mechanical alignment of the body and how it correlates and affects performance. After reading the book "8 Steps to a Pain-Free Back" by Esther Gokhale. I signed up for the Gokhale Method Foundations Course. This is where I learned to walk a line with my inner heels on that line. This was the deal breaker for me. I found that this movement along with using my feet properly and engaging my glutes externally rotated the leg and aligned my ankles, knees and hips. I am now 58 years old and I am happily running again without any knee issues. Today, I just came back from a barefoot run along the beach. I haven't had knee problems for 2+ years now.

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  • Michal Runner's Knee (PFPS)

    • Age 35-54
    • Female
    16
    Jan2016
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Physical activity per week 4-8 hours
    • Chronicity 0 - 6 Months
      Cured
      Rest, Supportive Shoes
      Improved
      Strengthening Exercises

    I had sharp pain in my knee mostly after sitting. I stopped running and tried strengthening exercises. The pain had improved but it was still there. After reading treatment reviews of other people on this site, I noticed that some people said that changing their shoes helped. I than remembered that couple of weeks before I had the knee pain I bought new running shoes and that might be part of the problem. I rested for couple more weeks and than started to run with my old shoes. My knee is cured now. I think the combination of rest and the right shoes cured my knee. The strengthening exercises helped.

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  • 03
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises, Cross training, Proper Running Form

    All there's no magic "cure" for injury prone knees. There are a host of things you can do to make life easier.
    Wear the correct shoes, you already have orthotics which is a great start.
    Have your gait analyzed, again you know you pronate so you can make a conscious effort to adjust your run and gear.
    Don't just run. You could have some sort of strength/flexibility imbalance in your feet, ankles, calves, thighs, back etc. Swim, stretch, cycle, do some yoga, pilates. Becoming a good all round athlete promotes healthier running.
    Don't run hurt. If your knees are crying in agony, don't "man up" and smash them into the concrete. Running is about making small incremental improvements, no one gets to long mileage without building up properly (or if they do, it's a recipe for injury).
    Establish a recovery routine. Ice, compression, elevation, ibuprofen. Even if you're not injured, these can help with post-run fatigue/aches and mean you can do more with quicker recovery between runs.
    Run short, run fast. Not everyone is made to plod 23 miles. Try short speed work, intervals, aim for 20 min 5ks, 6 min miles, there are plenty of challenging short distance goals which will challenge your running. What separates beginners to advanced runners is not their mileage but their abilities at the preferred distance. I have no knee pain since.

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  • 03
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
      Cured
      Stretching, Strengthening Exercises, Supplements, Proper Running Form, Foam Rolling

    I'm 34, 6'0", 185 lbs, and have run six marathons (and a zillion shorter distances). Our body types are probably similar. I worry a little that most runners in my echelon (I'm a 1:27 half / 3:20 full marathoner) have a different body type and less mass than me. Knee problems have always been an issue. But I do a lot of things to try to mitigate it:
    Static stretching after each run, like 10 minutes worth. I never ever skip this.
    I take glucosamine/chondroitin supplements. They're advertised as helping your cartilage, but their benefits haven't been conclusively proven. I figure at worst they're placebos, at best they're helping my knees stay in the game longer.
    Focus on good running form. For a long time (until the past six months) I was running in very heavy shoes that promote heel striking. I switched to entry-level Newtons and my form has gotten noticeably better, which I think has to be better for my body mechanics generally and my knees specifically.
    Spent decent time at the gym doing leg/core strengthening (along with upper body/other stuff). I used to completely skip this, thinking that the gym worked my upper body and running worked my lower body. That was a dumb thing to think. Hips, knees, and ankles need proper support from the muscles around them.
    Before every run I do the foam roll to loosen up my IT bands on the outsides of my legs. This helps ensure that they don't get tight and end up pulling my kneecap slightly out of alignment.
    Even given all of the above, my Dad (age 68) still likes to remind me of all his old pals who ran lots in their younger years and now have bad knees. I like to think that I'm doing it right and they didn't, that my training plan is better, that I have the benefit of modern shoes that they didn't. But the way I see it: even if I do end up with bad knees, I'd rather have spent my peak years using my body to its fullest rather than sitting on the sidelines preserving myself for retirement.

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  • 03
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
      Cured
      Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises, Proper Running Form

    I would suggest getting a gait analysis done. I went to a doctor who has a running clinic to get this done. He pointed out certain flexibility, strength issues and extreme pronation, that caused my knees to twist a lot when I would strike. He gave me a specific stretching and strengthening program, got me in the correct shoes and insoles (off-the-shelf) and I have not had any knee issues since. And I do about double my old mileage.
    Honestly, I recommend this for every runner I know, to avoid future problems. Best $300 I ever spent. The before and after videos of my gait are astounding.

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  • 03
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
      Cured
      Cross training
      Improved
      Physical Therapy, Stretching, Foam Rolling

    I had runner's knee for 2 years. I thought it was never going away. I tried everything from foam roller, stretching, going to PT.
    What worked in the end was cross training. I needed to strengthen my quads. Biking, hiking, swimming, climbing stairs did the trick. I could not only run everyday without switching it up.

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  • 03
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
      Cured
      Physical Therapy, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Strengthening Exercises, Proper Running Form

    I went to physical therapy. I was given some leg-strengthening exercises, and told to change the way I run. Lean forward a bit, and shorten my stride. Also, I stopped wearing these (http://www.saucony.com/en/jazz-original/11843W.html), and bought a proper pair of running shoes.
    After a few weeks off, things worked out.

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  • 03
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering
      Almost Cured
      Physical Therapy, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Strengthening Exercises, Cross training, Foam Rolling

    in my case -
    got MRI diagnosis was ligaments pulling kneecap up too far toward the quad
    did a bunch of physical therapy got a lot better after a few months, but honestly don't run as much since
    if you want to stay healthy running:
    get right shoes, replace them often if you have opportunities to run miles on something that's not pavement, take them. also cross train with e.g. biking, swimming, other low-impact
    stretch well (in my case, especially quads. also hamstring, calves, hip flexors - Google those running stretches). flexibility improves your form and posture and distributes strain. Yoga seems great but can't say I've ever managed to get into it. foam roll that quad and ligament
    LIGHT squats, lunges, reverse lunges, side lunges, agility drills vary the training, include hills, interval training
    truth is, some people are sound and run into old age, quite a lot of us are not and something gives out, knees are a prime candidate. in my case, adding 10-20 lbs didn't help ease the strain on joints. like a car, change the oil, take care of yourself and hope for the best. This has been the best for me and so far I'm good.

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