Other for Shin Splints

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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other, Proper Running Form

    Other than eliminating "heel strike" (running on your heels) there are a few things that are really helpful. I run track and got shin splints a little over a year ago and the only things I have found to really help with the pain is ice messages and KT tape. If you can get your hands on any disposable paper cups fill them with water (not all the way full) and put them in the freezer (I like to make 12 or so ata time). Then after every run, take one out, rip off the bottom, and message the area of pain. It really helps to push deep with the ice making sure to message the muscle. Additionally, if you drop by any CVS you can pick up KT Tape which is an emmnse help with pain. The company's website has instructions for how to apply the tape for your area of pain. Just note that shin splints comes in two flavors- low and high (depending on the are if your shin that has the pain) so apply which ever method is for you. Lastly, stretching out your calves is really important and I would recommend getting a roller (google "the stick").


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs

    I've been running competitive track for almost 10 years now and this is a recurring problem for me. I have super flat feet so this causes my foot to pronate (or flatten towards the inside) more than the regular person. This in turn stresses my Tibialis Posterior muscle (muscle that runs just to the inside of your shin or rather, tibia).

    Anyways I've found that what kept me going through workouts wasn't meds (actally stopped taking them after I started doing this), but here is what I found work:

    • Always, always, ALWAYS, ice for 10 mins on/10 mins off after a workout. Do this about 2-3 times. This slows down the nerve conduction which decreases pain and also vasoconstricts the area to prevent any swelling that may occur from irritation/micro tears. I prefer to fill a bucket with water and ice and just dive in up to my knees.

    • Stretch your calves everywhere and anywhere you go. Tightness in your calves can also contribute to shin pain

    • Heat is secondary, but becomes more important if the problem becomes chronic. Do the same as with the ice but with hot water to also reduce pain but also to loosen up the tissue.

    • This last part is where things really got exponentially better, but at the expense of short term pain...
      Strip the crud out of that Tib Post. Ever had a proper massage? Not one of those where the guy/girl lightly pokes you and bam you're done. I'm talking the kind where you're stripping the muscle and fascia in order to break down scar tissue. This is what I did all the time. It works way better in the shower since you can sit down and use a bit of body soap as a lubricant, but if you take your thumb and just run it down the inside of your shin. It WILL hurt, but you're deeply massaging that muscle which in conjunction with the heat from the shower will help to not only break up and loosen that tissue, but also promotes blood flow the area which in turn promotes healing

    The last part gets extremely painful, but after you step out of the shower or wherever, you honestly feel like a million bucks. (At least I did).


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Other
      Not Improved
      Compression

    I get bad shin splints but cause I play rugby, I just gotta deal with it. What's helped the most is to ice them in the morning, after working out, and before bed, along with ibuprofen 800 3x daily. I've used those compression sleeves too, but I think that's mainly placebo. When they get bad I can't squat, but can still deadlift oddly enough. If it's available, getting some ART work might help too. That was one of the more painful sessions I've had done, but you try it all to get shit fixed


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Not Improved
      Physical Therapy, Orthotics, Supportive Shoes, Proper Running Form

    Seriously consider acupuncture. I was a cross country runner all through high school and after I graduated I joined the military which required more running. I had chronic shin splints the entire time. I changed shoes, had my gait analyzed, had physical therapy, even had custom orthodic inserts made and nothing worked. Researched acupuncture and was skeptical, but to my complete surprise they were gone after two treatments. Don't know how or why but that was 3 years ago and haven't had them since.


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  • triviasue Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Improved
      Ice, Massage, Stretching

    My shin splints will always come back with a vengeance if I increase my mileage too quickly or dramatically. I do all the other stuff as an extra measure (stretching, icing, rolling, etc) but none of that will stop them if I try to do more than my body is ready for.


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  • Andrew Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    01
    Sep2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Massage, Supportive Shoes

    I suffered for years. So debilitating I could hardly walk. I'm an exercise physiologist so I thought I knew exactly how to fix the problem. I tried everything I knew according to the scientific research. Footwear, ice, massage, anti-inflamms, etc etc. Whilst they helped to alleviate acute symptoms - they didn't help long-term.
    Believe it or not - NUTRITION fixed my chronic problem. I know, it sounds crazy. I eliminated grains (specifically gluten) for autoimmune disease purposes and my shin splints literally disappeared. All training variables remained the same, but the shin splints went away. I think your article is great but I just thought I'd toss nutrition into the mix as another alternative for chronic sufferers.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    I used to experience shin splints until one day my coach told me to loosen my laces and lo and behold, the shin splints were gone. If it's not that, then I would recommend doing some leg stretches before warming up. Otherwise maybe you should try another pair of sneakers and make sure not to tie them too tight.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    Look into the so-called "chi-running" technique. I suffered from shin splints chronically every time I took up running until I used it's techniques. A YouTube search will get you a lot of info on this.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    I suffered occasionally from shin splints and a runner friend suggested I loosen my laces as having them even slightly too tight could cause shin pain. Loosening them work a treat for me and I haven't suffered once since


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Rest, Other

    When it happened to me it was at least a month or two before I could run again. Muscles are full of blood and heal quickly (shouldn't take more than a week). The more impatient you are now in getting back to high impact activities, the worse it will be. I was very impatient when it happened to me.

    Avoid anything that causes stress on the shins for now. Still workout, but do low impact exercise like cycling and squats. Also might be worth checking that you're getting enough Vitamin D and Calcium.

    Personally I don't believe in rolling the shins too hard with a ball. If the goal is to increase blood circulation to the lower leg then just massaging with your fingers should achieve the same thing.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    I ran long distance for my track team in high school. Duck walk. After running, point your toes skyward and walk on your heels for at least one eighth of a mile. This will stretch the required muscles to alleviate shin splints.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    I know from running most of my friends who have had it can alleviate it with a mid foot or arch support wrap around their foot while running.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    This might sound generic as all hell but drink lots and lots of water. I myself reluctantly heeded this advice from a friend and felt drastic relief the very next day.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Stretching, Other

    When I started running I use to get them bad. Eat potassium, as in bananas. I tried Rub A535 it slightly helped. Do calf stretches on a step or stairs ( google it).


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes, Other

    Fat runner here, this is what you do. Go to expensive running shoe store and find out what kind of shoes are best for your natural running style. Split, and get them for significantly cheaper on amazon. I use asics gel kayanos because I overpronate. That and patella bands and Boom no more shin splints; you're welcome. Oh yea and stretch and $hit.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      Orthotics, Ice, Other

    I have the same but I have collapsed arches. With insole it doesn't go away 100% but it does improve significantly. After that post game ice to reduce swelling, hot baths to relax the muscles and rollers are a good idea.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Stretching, Other

    I ran slower, more frequently, and stretched everyday to get rid of my shin splints. The slower pace produced less slapping.


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  • squigsdad Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other

    I read an article while I was in boot camp that helped me immensely. It surprised me to learn that people that sleep on their stomach, instead of on their sides or back, have higher instances of shin splints. It has to do with how the toes tend to point down when you are sleeping on your stomach and the calf muscles get shorter as opposed to stretching when you sleep. Hope that helps.


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