Stretching for Shin Splints

Latest reviews
MORE FILTERS
4.8out of 5
Not improved(3)
Improved(2)
Almost cured(19)
Cured(62)
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises, Proper Running Form

    Check running form, try to run on softer surfaces, maybe buy new shoes, ice for 15-20 min, strengthen anterior tibialis, and write the alphabet with your ankles. I may be missing something, but these are the main things I have done along with appropriate stretching.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Proper Running Form
      Improved
      Ice, Massage, Supportive Shoes, Stretching

    I tried different shoes, foam rolling, icing, calf stretching. What eventually helped for me was switching to forefoot/midfoot striking. Even just try it for a couple minutes, it is an immense relief. But it's pretty risky to make that big of a change in gait in a short period of time.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    I've never been to a PT or any professional for my shin splints. I did go to podiatrist shortly after one occurrence but for an unrelated injury. What I found that helped me was to completely change my shoes to a zero drop shoe, focus on running on the balls of my feet rather than heel striking, stretching out my calves, foam rolling my shins after each and every run, and possibly the most important, taking the time to heal before trying again. During my research of shin splints and my own experience, it's usually always a muscle imbalance, bad form, and too much intensity. Certain arches makes you more likely to develop shin splints.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other, Proper Running Form

    Other than eliminating "heel strike" (running on your heels) there are a few things that are really helpful. I run track and got shin splints a little over a year ago and the only things I have found to really help with the pain is ice messages and KT tape. If you can get your hands on any disposable paper cups fill them with water (not all the way full) and put them in the freezer (I like to make 12 or so ata time). Then after every run, take one out, rip off the bottom, and message the area of pain. It really helps to push deep with the ice making sure to message the muscle. Additionally, if you drop by any CVS you can pick up KT Tape which is an emmnse help with pain. The company's website has instructions for how to apply the tape for your area of pain. Just note that shin splints comes in two flavors- low and high (depending on the are if your shin that has the pain) so apply which ever method is for you. Lastly, stretching out your calves is really important and I would recommend getting a roller (google "the stick").


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs

    I've been running competitive track for almost 10 years now and this is a recurring problem for me. I have super flat feet so this causes my foot to pronate (or flatten towards the inside) more than the regular person. This in turn stresses my Tibialis Posterior muscle (muscle that runs just to the inside of your shin or rather, tibia).

    Anyways I've found that what kept me going through workouts wasn't meds (actally stopped taking them after I started doing this), but here is what I found work:

    • Always, always, ALWAYS, ice for 10 mins on/10 mins off after a workout. Do this about 2-3 times. This slows down the nerve conduction which decreases pain and also vasoconstricts the area to prevent any swelling that may occur from irritation/micro tears. I prefer to fill a bucket with water and ice and just dive in up to my knees.

    • Stretch your calves everywhere and anywhere you go. Tightness in your calves can also contribute to shin pain

    • Heat is secondary, but becomes more important if the problem becomes chronic. Do the same as with the ice but with hot water to also reduce pain but also to loosen up the tissue.

    • This last part is where things really got exponentially better, but at the expense of short term pain...
      Strip the crud out of that Tib Post. Ever had a proper massage? Not one of those where the guy/girl lightly pokes you and bam you're done. I'm talking the kind where you're stripping the muscle and fascia in order to break down scar tissue. This is what I did all the time. It works way better in the shower since you can sit down and use a bit of body soap as a lubricant, but if you take your thumb and just run it down the inside of your shin. It WILL hurt, but you're deeply massaging that muscle which in conjunction with the heat from the shower will help to not only break up and loosen that tissue, but also promotes blood flow the area which in turn promotes healing

    The last part gets extremely painful, but after you step out of the shower or wherever, you honestly feel like a million bucks. (At least I did).


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Rest, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    Forefoot running helped me with shin splints. Do stretches that focus on the shin area before and after the workout if they get worse, only after if you can deal with them. or in the worst case situation like mine was, just take a coke bottle put water in it and freeze it and put it under the shin when you watch tv or something, this should help you with the pain + the stretches. just take time off from running, i took a 2 week break till i could run again and never had problems with the shin splints again, still had the same fitness as before, just felt a little bit more hard to breath, but that wasn't really a big problem and got quickly back on track.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises

    I used to develop shin splints all the time until a took a cardio course that forced me to do 40-60 min of cardio 3 times a week. In order to fix this I first got new shoes with good insoles and started focusing on stretching my calves and trying to strengthen my anterior tib (muscles on front of shin). The way I built up to distance running was using a stationary cycling bike to build my endurance, progressed to elliptical to get used to the motions of running down with the endurance I gained, then onto the track. When I first started running didn't go very far distance wise, but I was able to jog for the entire workout without pain or being too exhausted.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Rest, Compression, Supportive Shoes, Stretching
      Not Improved
      Orthotics

    After leg surgery on both legs I got awful shin splints from even walking. Minimalist shoes helped strengthen(the OPPOSITE of orthotics which baby and eventually weaken) them, stretching and ice helped soothe them, and compression sleeves helped me still be able to run, and I'd even wear them while resting to help soothe as well. Choose any one of these three and I think you'll see at least an improvement. Time also helps.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Massage, Compression, Stretching

    I literally fixed my shin splints in one day.
    Watch this video, try these stretches https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgu6poYC-lk
    Get calf compression socks or fitting
    Use a foam roller and tenderize yo meat
    See if you need better running shoes. I used to wear these shitty $40 adidas that probably made it worse.
    I was prescribed 3 ibuprofen a day 3 times a day which helped a little, just food for thought.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises, Proper Running Form

    A runner I looked up to told me three big points that have helped me with shin splints. 1. Run lightly. Almost tip toe and land on the balls of your feet. Form is crucial. Listen to the noise you're making. It shouldn't be very loud and there should be no dragging. 2. Exercise and stretch. Stretch your calves by propping your feet against a wall, fence, post whatever and leaning forward keeping your legs straight. Another is push against an object focusing on keeping your feet flat on the ground far behind you. Stretch your shins (this works best barefoot) by pointing your toes into the ground and rolling them to point back. Another is sitting down and pointing your toes forward and reaching out. 3. Keep your lower legs strong. This may sound like common sense or it might sound weird. But do your calf raises and range of motion work. Something he told me is lay a small towel (a dish towel works great) on the ground and stand on one end and pull it in with your toes. Repeat a few times.
    Also keep up with your shoes. It's expensive but it's the most important piece of equipment. Barefoot/minimalist shoes are increasing popularity. In my opinion this is a good thing. It is more natural. I like Brooks and Saucony but one shoe does not fit all especially when it comes to running shoes. Ask an expert at the store. Hope this helps! Keep running


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Supplements, Proper Running Form

    I'm only in High school but I've been running for 5 years:
    Fix your running form, land mid foot, not on your heal.
    Get proper running shoes
    Stretch more often
    Get more calcium; I drink milk all the time because I use to have tons of issues with shin splints/stress fractures, no issues anymore.
    Ice your shins


    Read more  
  • triviasue Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Improved
      Ice, Massage, Stretching

    My shin splints will always come back with a vengeance if I increase my mileage too quickly or dramatically. I do all the other stuff as an extra measure (stretching, icing, rolling, etc) but none of that will stop them if I try to do more than my body is ready for.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Proper Running Form
    • Reevaluate your running form. Are you striking on your heel? Try to hit the ground more evenly to attempt to strike more on your forefoot.
    • Running store --> Gait analysis --> New shoes, maybe inserts
    • Stretch stretch stretch. Try and improve your ankle mobility and strength. Before and after runs try and write the alphabet in the air with your toes to stretch your ankles out. Stand on a step with your feet partially over the edge and move your feet up and down, if you have shin splints this will hurt, but it will make your muscles stronger.
    • Ice your shins and calves
    • Rest
    • Get off the treadmill. Run outside in varied terrain where every single pace won't hit the same parts of your legs over and over again, as on a treadmill
    • Foam roll your shins and calves

    Source: Used to have shin splints, this is all the advice I found online and got from my doctor. Did all these things, no longer have shin splints.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    Number one for me: taking shorter strides. Running form was the start and end to my shin splints. Once I figured out that I needed to take shorter strides, my shin splints disappeared almost entirely. With stretches and rolling and icing, they don't bother me at all.


    Read more  
  • Hana Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      Rest, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises
      Not Improved
      Taping

    I had this a few times before. I just rested for about a week. Tried taping but it didn't help. I found out that the most helpful (for me) to avoid shin splints were the following: (1) adequate stretching of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (using 2 different lunge-like routines --> simple but hard to explain here; but you can search online how it is done); and (2) strengthening of the soleus muscles(by simply raising myself on tiptoes several times).