NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs for Shin Splints

Latest reviews
MORE FILTERS
4.6out of 5
Not improved(4)
Improved(2)
Almost cured(5)
Cured(9)
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs

    I've been running competitive track for almost 10 years now and this is a recurring problem for me. I have super flat feet so this causes my foot to pronate (or flatten towards the inside) more than the regular person. This in turn stresses my Tibialis Posterior muscle (muscle that runs just to the inside of your shin or rather, tibia).

    Anyways I've found that what kept me going through workouts wasn't meds (actally stopped taking them after I started doing this), but here is what I found work:

    • Always, always, ALWAYS, ice for 10 mins on/10 mins off after a workout. Do this about 2-3 times. This slows down the nerve conduction which decreases pain and also vasoconstricts the area to prevent any swelling that may occur from irritation/micro tears. I prefer to fill a bucket with water and ice and just dive in up to my knees.

    • Stretch your calves everywhere and anywhere you go. Tightness in your calves can also contribute to shin pain

    • Heat is secondary, but becomes more important if the problem becomes chronic. Do the same as with the ice but with hot water to also reduce pain but also to loosen up the tissue.

    • This last part is where things really got exponentially better, but at the expense of short term pain...
      Strip the crud out of that Tib Post. Ever had a proper massage? Not one of those where the guy/girl lightly pokes you and bam you're done. I'm talking the kind where you're stripping the muscle and fascia in order to break down scar tissue. This is what I did all the time. It works way better in the shower since you can sit down and use a bit of body soap as a lubricant, but if you take your thumb and just run it down the inside of your shin. It WILL hurt, but you're deeply massaging that muscle which in conjunction with the heat from the shower will help to not only break up and loosen that tissue, but also promotes blood flow the area which in turn promotes healing

    The last part gets extremely painful, but after you step out of the shower or wherever, you honestly feel like a million bucks. (At least I did).


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Massage, Strengthening Exercises

    I'm a track coach and this is a guide I've written up for my athletes for treating the actual physical issue. There could be issues in your form, shoes, feet etc. that make you prone to this kind of thing but in some cases it's just simply from imbalances in strength in the muscles.
    Shin Splints 101
    Some basic shin splint care is based around 3 things:
    � Strengthening Exercises
    � Massage
    � Dealing with Inflammation
    Strengthening:
    Exercise 1 � Place your butt against a wall. Place your feet together and about 2-3 ft in front of the wall. Now raise your toes, keeping your heels stationary. Raise your toes 10 times.
    Exercise 2 � Keeping your heels together and your feet the same distance from the wall, point your toes outward. Raise your toes 10 times, as high as they can go.
    Exercise 3 � Now point your toes inward, raise your toes 10 times, as high as they can go. Repeat 1-3 2 times total.
    Feet Position should look like
    !!
    \ /
    / \
    Calf Raises: Stand with your feet together and go up to your toes 2x15, again full range of motion (all the way up, all the way down)
    Toe Crunches: Exactly what it sounds like. Crunch your toes 50 times in the morning, 50 times at night. Increase the numbers as you feel you are getting stronger.
    Massage:
    Grab some hand cream or something like that and grab a nice big glob in your hands. Lather up your shins and dig in, make sure you really dig in and break up adhesions in your muscles, digging on both sides of the shin bone, work out your calf as well. This isn�t meant to be comfortable, really dig in there, you will know if you�re in the right spot mostly but how sore it is. You don�t want to kill it but you should work through the discomfort a little bit and feel it loosening up a bit.
    Inflammation: Ice, Ice and more Ice. Get a good icepack, heck a bag of peas or corn will work if you�re in a pinch. After you massage make sure you ice for at least 15 minutes on the shins. 15 minutes on, 15 minutes off � 2 or 3 times while watching TV at night will go along way to helping!
    If your shins are really bad and I mean really bad you can take some Aleve or Advil which are anti-inflammatory, Aleve is recommended. 2 Aleve pills in the morning and 2 before you go to bed. Take it for 3-4 days. You don�t want to take the pills for too long obviously but it will help with the initial inflammation if they are almost unbearable.
    This isn�t going to be an instant fix, you really need to stick with the strengthening exercises doing them daily and massage every other day or everyday if you feel if it�s necessary. A few weeks of this and your shins should be feeling better!


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Other
      Not Improved
      Compression

    I get bad shin splints but cause I play rugby, I just gotta deal with it. What's helped the most is to ice them in the morning, after working out, and before bed, along with ibuprofen 800 3x daily. I've used those compression sleeves too, but I think that's mainly placebo. When they get bad I can't squat, but can still deadlift oddly enough. If it's available, getting some ART work might help too. That was one of the more painful sessions I've had done, but you try it all to get shit fixed


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Massage, Compression, Stretching

    I literally fixed my shin splints in one day.
    Watch this video, try these stretches https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgu6poYC-lk
    Get calf compression socks or fitting
    Use a foam roller and tenderize yo meat
    See if you need better running shoes. I used to wear these shitty $40 adidas that probably made it worse.
    I was prescribed 3 ibuprofen a day 3 times a day which helped a little, just food for thought.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Rest, Stretching

    My husband is in the police academy and so rest is not an option. We have found that ibuprofen, ice and resting whenever possible has been the best solution. He still has episodes in which it is painful, and it is difficult to walk. It is a very frustrating thing. Stretches and elevation seem to be helping the most.


    Read more  
  • Katherine Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Rest
      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Stretching

    I've had shin splints, don't push through any pain! If you're in pain, rest! I learned the hard way and ended up having to stop running for a few weeks which really set me back. Like people have been saying, ice, stretches, there are wall stretches that help. I have also used anti inflamatories such as aleve to help. Just don't over do it!


    Read more  
  • Andrew Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    01
    Sep2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Massage, Supportive Shoes

    I suffered for years. So debilitating I could hardly walk. I'm an exercise physiologist so I thought I knew exactly how to fix the problem. I tried everything I knew according to the scientific research. Footwear, ice, massage, anti-inflamms, etc etc. Whilst they helped to alleviate acute symptoms - they didn't help long-term.
    Believe it or not - NUTRITION fixed my chronic problem. I know, it sounds crazy. I eliminated grains (specifically gluten) for autoimmune disease purposes and my shin splints literally disappeared. All training variables remained the same, but the shin splints went away. I think your article is great but I just thought I'd toss nutrition into the mix as another alternative for chronic sufferers.


    Read more  
  • 19
    Jun2011
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching

    I've dealt with shin splints countless times. First off, have you been assessed for proper running wear? If you go to a running store, anyone who works there should be able to look at your bare feet while you stand and determine if you pronate or supinate and recommend the correct shoe.

    Secondly... it sucks but you have to stop running for a bit. Probably a few weeks. If you can use an elliptical or bike to keep up your cardio, do it. But the tendons in your legs are inflamed, and running through the pain will not make them better. You can probably feel painful knots along the inside of your shin ridge if you run your fingers over them. Take an anti-inflammatory (I like ibuoprofen) for a few days and ice ice ice. I had trouble icing my legs at work, so I cheated and used Biofreeze. Stretch after you've worked out and gotten warmed up.

    When I went to the gym, I used a foam roller up and down on my shins, and, yeah, it hurt a LOT. I can't tell if it made much difference but after rolling my shins while they were relaxed, I pointed my toes and pulled them toward me as I used the foam roller. I also massaged my shins with my thumbs several times during the day. Damn it hurts, but you gotta get those knots worked out.

    When you start running again, be more gradual in building your mileage. I think the general rule is don't increase your mileage by more than 10% each week. Awesome shoes should help a lot too. I notice I'm more prone to shin splints when I forget to replace my kicks and let them get run down. And continue to stretch after your workouts even after the shin splints are gone.


    Read more  
  • Anonymous Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • 5' 7"
    28
    Jul2017
    • Injury Status Recovering
    • Physical activity per week 4-8 hours
    • Chronicity 0 - 6 Months
    • Repeat injury? Yes

    Treatment Ratings

      Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Orthotics, Strengthening Exercises
      Not Improved
      Physical Therapy, Shockwave

    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Proper Running Form

    You can also take ibuprofen and ice your shins to reduce inflammation. The longer you run and perfect your for though, the less shin splints you will encounter.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Stretching, Other

    When I started running I use to get them bad. Eat potassium, as in bananas. I tried Rub A535 it slightly helped. Do calf stretches on a step or stairs ( google it).


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status In Pain
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs

    Shin splint crew checkin in.
    Had them for the past 2 years. They started with my tren blast while doing lots of cardio. It's better now, but I can't seem to get rid of them. Might also be related to constantly getting bigger and heavier. Don't do cardio now, but I'm not able to run with these splints anyway.
    The only thing that helped is deca. Haven't found anything else, yet.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Other

    As far as alleviating them...take ibuprofen and use kinesio-tape. Look up a YouTube video of how to tape yourself and put it on. It works wonders for me.


    Read more  
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Stretching

    I had wicked shin splints after gaining a good bit of weight and getting into jogging to lose it. I just gritted it out and took ibuprofen and eventually they went away. Had to be the decreased weight being carried along with improved leg strength. Also stretched out my calves pretty thoroughly before and after running. Good luck, they suck but can be overcome.


    Read more  
  • Jacko Shin Splints

    • Age 55+
    • Male
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings