Rest for Shin Splints

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4.8out of 5
Not improved(3)
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  • L07 Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics, Ice, Rest, Compression

    I used to get shin splints in a big way. First, RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Then look at your shoes. It turned out I needed some serious arch support. Either a product like super feet or from a doctor. It made a huge difference.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 6-18 Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Improved
      Ice, Rest, Compression, Proper Running Form

    I'm not saying that minimalist shoes get rid of shin splints, but my personal experience was that my shin splints went away when I switched to them, and they haven't come back even as I transitioned back to more cushioned shoes a few years ago.

    I started running in 06, developed pretty debilitating shin splints by late 07 and over the next year went to several different specialty running stores to get fitted for more and more cushioned (and expensive) shoes. My shin splints got worse. I tried ice baths, compression wraps, trying to change my stride, dramatically cutting back my running volume, etc.

    In 08 I read a post on Reddit making fun of the way VFFs looked and saw a few comments by people saying they had fixed their shin splints. By that point I was desperate and willing to try anything. Bought a pair (cheapest running shoes I ever bought until I discovered cross country shoes years later) and within three months my shin splints were gone. The only time they ever came back was when I misplaced them a year later and did a brisk 7 miles in an old pair of aggressively cushioned shoes.

    I have no idea how or why it worked, or if it will work for other people. I do know that:
    The VFFs were extremely punishing to me as a heel striker and I quickly became a mid-foot striker.

    My pace slowed down considerably when I transitioned, as my feet were now the most sore part of my running anatomy and took a while to acclimate.

    My volume decreased significantly at first, for the same reason.

    I have long since stopped running in VFFs, switching to progressively less minimalist shoes as the years have gone by, though I do still trail run in cross country shoes. I think I've found that for me personally the less toe drop in the shoe the better, but about 8 to 10 mm of cushion is pretty nice for those long road runs.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Rest, Supportive Shoes, Strengthening Exercises
      Worsened
      Orthotics

    Rest. When you do heal up, I'm a huge believer in minimalistic shoes and barefoot running to strengthen up your calves. Jumping rope barefoot is also a great exercise. I was prone to shin splits playing football and that was the only thing that made a difference. Orthotics were just a crutch that allowed my feet to get weaker.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    I've never been to a PT or any professional for my shin splints. I did go to podiatrist shortly after one occurrence but for an unrelated injury. What I found that helped me was to completely change my shoes to a zero drop shoe, focus on running on the balls of my feet rather than heel striking, stretching out my calves, foam rolling my shins after each and every run, and possibly the most important, taking the time to heal before trying again. During my research of shin splints and my own experience, it's usually always a muscle imbalance, bad form, and too much intensity. Certain arches makes you more likely to develop shin splints.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Not Improved
      Ice, Massage, Rest

    When I was training up for Ranger School years back I was running about 20 miles a week in a pair of Brooks and developed the worst shin splints. I tried to rest, ice it, massage, and nothing really did much. The only thing that worked for me was switching to a minimalist shoe (I used nike 3.0s). The pain got a lot worse that first week I was in the nikes, but once my body adjusted it was great. I havnt had any shin or foot issues since!


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Rest, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    Forefoot running helped me with shin splints. Do stretches that focus on the shin area before and after the workout if they get worse, only after if you can deal with them. or in the worst case situation like mine was, just take a coke bottle put water in it and freeze it and put it under the shin when you watch tv or something, this should help you with the pain + the stretches. just take time off from running, i took a 2 week break till i could run again and never had problems with the shin splints again, still had the same fitness as before, just felt a little bit more hard to breath, but that wasn't really a big problem and got quickly back on track.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics, Ice, Rest, Supportive Shoes

    I was a sprinter in high school and used to get really bad shin splints once a year. If the shin splints develop as you run farther and farther, your leg muscles may be getting fatigued and not absorbing the shock of running very well, causing your tibia/shins to absorb the shock.
    Some things that could help: - better running shoes or insoles - running on softer ground; rubber track, grass, sand, dirt. Avoid cement and concrete. - slowly increase distance you run so your muscles get used to it - supplement your cardio by riding a fixed cycle/bicycle to increase cardio without putting more stress on your joints/bones/etc - I personally did not run as hard when I developed shin splints, if it hurts to run, you're only gonna make it worse, best to let it heal, also icing it might help with recovery.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Rest, Compression, Supportive Shoes, Stretching
      Not Improved
      Orthotics

    After leg surgery on both legs I got awful shin splints from even walking. Minimalist shoes helped strengthen(the OPPOSITE of orthotics which baby and eventually weaken) them, stretching and ice helped soothe them, and compression sleeves helped me still be able to run, and I'd even wear them while resting to help soothe as well. Choose any one of these three and I think you'll see at least an improvement. Time also helps.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Proper Running Form
    • Reevaluate your running form. Are you striking on your heel? Try to hit the ground more evenly to attempt to strike more on your forefoot.
    • Running store --> Gait analysis --> New shoes, maybe inserts
    • Stretch stretch stretch. Try and improve your ankle mobility and strength. Before and after runs try and write the alphabet in the air with your toes to stretch your ankles out. Stand on a step with your feet partially over the edge and move your feet up and down, if you have shin splints this will hurt, but it will make your muscles stronger.
    • Ice your shins and calves
    • Rest
    • Get off the treadmill. Run outside in varied terrain where every single pace won't hit the same parts of your legs over and over again, as on a treadmill
    • Foam roll your shins and calves

    Source: Used to have shin splints, this is all the advice I found online and got from my doctor. Did all these things, no longer have shin splints.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Rest, Stretching

    My husband is in the police academy and so rest is not an option. We have found that ibuprofen, ice and resting whenever possible has been the best solution. He still has episodes in which it is painful, and it is difficult to walk. It is a very frustrating thing. Stretches and elevation seem to be helping the most.


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  • Hana Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      Rest, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises
      Not Improved
      Taping

    I had this a few times before. I just rested for about a week. Tried taping but it didn't help. I found out that the most helpful (for me) to avoid shin splints were the following: (1) adequate stretching of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (using 2 different lunge-like routines --> simple but hard to explain here; but you can search online how it is done); and (2) strengthening of the soleus muscles(by simply raising myself on tiptoes several times).


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  • Breanna Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 0 - 6 Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Rest, Taping, Stretching

    I suffered 10 weeks with shin splints, dumb i know since i should have rested them, one thing i did was tape my arches up for longer runs and after a week of rest i have done 25 minutes of hill training every week and they seem to be getting better. Also massage, stretching and ice work wonders.


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  • Katherine Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Rest
      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Stretching

    I've had shin splints, don't push through any pain! If you're in pain, rest! I learned the hard way and ended up having to stop running for a few weeks which really set me back. Like people have been saying, ice, stretches, there are wall stretches that help. I have also used anti inflamatories such as aleve to help. Just don't over do it!


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  • John Shin Splints

    • Age 35-54
    • Male
    10
    Nov2015
    • Injury Status Recovering
    • Physical activity per week 0-4 hours
    • Chronicity 18+ Months
    • Repeat injury? Yes

    Treatment Ratings

      Improved
      Rest

    Got shin split at age 17 and 20 years later it still occurs when I'm running. No solution other than resting.


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  • James Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    25
    Oct2012