Massage for Shin Splints

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5out of 5
Not improved(2)
Improved(2)
Cured(26)
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Proper Running Form
      Improved
      Ice, Massage, Supportive Shoes, Stretching

    I tried different shoes, foam rolling, icing, calf stretching. What eventually helped for me was switching to forefoot/midfoot striking. Even just try it for a couple minutes, it is an immense relief. But it's pretty risky to make that big of a change in gait in a short period of time.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    I've never been to a PT or any professional for my shin splints. I did go to podiatrist shortly after one occurrence but for an unrelated injury. What I found that helped me was to completely change my shoes to a zero drop shoe, focus on running on the balls of my feet rather than heel striking, stretching out my calves, foam rolling my shins after each and every run, and possibly the most important, taking the time to heal before trying again. During my research of shin splints and my own experience, it's usually always a muscle imbalance, bad form, and too much intensity. Certain arches makes you more likely to develop shin splints.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Not Improved
      Ice, Massage, Rest

    When I was training up for Ranger School years back I was running about 20 miles a week in a pair of Brooks and developed the worst shin splints. I tried to rest, ice it, massage, and nothing really did much. The only thing that worked for me was switching to a minimalist shoe (I used nike 3.0s). The pain got a lot worse that first week I was in the nikes, but once my body adjusted it was great. I havnt had any shin or foot issues since!


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other, Proper Running Form

    Other than eliminating "heel strike" (running on your heels) there are a few things that are really helpful. I run track and got shin splints a little over a year ago and the only things I have found to really help with the pain is ice messages and KT tape. If you can get your hands on any disposable paper cups fill them with water (not all the way full) and put them in the freezer (I like to make 12 or so ata time). Then after every run, take one out, rip off the bottom, and message the area of pain. It really helps to push deep with the ice making sure to message the muscle. Additionally, if you drop by any CVS you can pick up KT Tape which is an emmnse help with pain. The company's website has instructions for how to apply the tape for your area of pain. Just note that shin splints comes in two flavors- low and high (depending on the are if your shin that has the pain) so apply which ever method is for you. Lastly, stretching out your calves is really important and I would recommend getting a roller (google "the stick").


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs

    I've been running competitive track for almost 10 years now and this is a recurring problem for me. I have super flat feet so this causes my foot to pronate (or flatten towards the inside) more than the regular person. This in turn stresses my Tibialis Posterior muscle (muscle that runs just to the inside of your shin or rather, tibia).

    Anyways I've found that what kept me going through workouts wasn't meds (actally stopped taking them after I started doing this), but here is what I found work:

    • Always, always, ALWAYS, ice for 10 mins on/10 mins off after a workout. Do this about 2-3 times. This slows down the nerve conduction which decreases pain and also vasoconstricts the area to prevent any swelling that may occur from irritation/micro tears. I prefer to fill a bucket with water and ice and just dive in up to my knees.

    • Stretch your calves everywhere and anywhere you go. Tightness in your calves can also contribute to shin pain

    • Heat is secondary, but becomes more important if the problem becomes chronic. Do the same as with the ice but with hot water to also reduce pain but also to loosen up the tissue.

    • This last part is where things really got exponentially better, but at the expense of short term pain...
      Strip the crud out of that Tib Post. Ever had a proper massage? Not one of those where the guy/girl lightly pokes you and bam you're done. I'm talking the kind where you're stripping the muscle and fascia in order to break down scar tissue. This is what I did all the time. It works way better in the shower since you can sit down and use a bit of body soap as a lubricant, but if you take your thumb and just run it down the inside of your shin. It WILL hurt, but you're deeply massaging that muscle which in conjunction with the heat from the shower will help to not only break up and loosen that tissue, but also promotes blood flow the area which in turn promotes healing

    The last part gets extremely painful, but after you step out of the shower or wherever, you honestly feel like a million bucks. (At least I did).


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Massage, Strengthening Exercises

    I'm a track coach and this is a guide I've written up for my athletes for treating the actual physical issue. There could be issues in your form, shoes, feet etc. that make you prone to this kind of thing but in some cases it's just simply from imbalances in strength in the muscles.
    Shin Splints 101
    Some basic shin splint care is based around 3 things:
    • Strengthening Exercises
    • Massage
    • Dealing with Inflammation
    Strengthening:
    Exercise 1 – Place your butt against a wall. Place your feet together and about 2-3 ft in front of the wall. Now raise your toes, keeping your heels stationary. Raise your toes 10 times.
    Exercise 2 – Keeping your heels together and your feet the same distance from the wall, point your toes outward. Raise your toes 10 times, as high as they can go.
    Exercise 3 – Now point your toes inward, raise your toes 10 times, as high as they can go. Repeat 1-3 2 times total.
    Feet Position should look like
    !!
    \ /
    / \
    Calf Raises: Stand with your feet together and go up to your toes 2x15, again full range of motion (all the way up, all the way down)
    Toe Crunches: Exactly what it sounds like. Crunch your toes 50 times in the morning, 50 times at night. Increase the numbers as you feel you are getting stronger.
    Massage:
    Grab some hand cream or something like that and grab a nice big glob in your hands. Lather up your shins and dig in, make sure you really dig in and break up adhesions in your muscles, digging on both sides of the shin bone, work out your calf as well. This isn’t meant to be comfortable, really dig in there, you will know if you’re in the right spot mostly but how sore it is. You don’t want to kill it but you should work through the discomfort a little bit and feel it loosening up a bit.
    Inflammation: Ice, Ice and more Ice. Get a good icepack, heck a bag of peas or corn will work if you’re in a pinch. After you massage make sure you ice for at least 15 minutes on the shins. 15 minutes on, 15 minutes off – 2 or 3 times while watching TV at night will go along way to helping!
    If your shins are really bad and I mean really bad you can take some Aleve or Advil which are anti-inflammatory, Aleve is recommended. 2 Aleve pills in the morning and 2 before you go to bed. Take it for 3-4 days. You don’t want to take the pills for too long obviously but it will help with the initial inflammation if they are almost unbearable.
    This isn’t going to be an instant fix, you really need to stick with the strengthening exercises doing them daily and massage every other day or everyday if you feel if it’s necessary. A few weeks of this and your shins should be feeling better!


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Massage, Compression, Stretching

    I literally fixed my shin splints in one day.
    Watch this video, try these stretches https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgu6poYC-lk
    Get calf compression socks or fitting
    Use a foam roller and tenderize yo meat
    See if you need better running shoes. I used to wear these shitty $40 adidas that probably made it worse.
    I was prescribed 3 ibuprofen a day 3 times a day which helped a little, just food for thought.


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  • triviasue Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Improved
      Ice, Massage, Stretching

    My shin splints will always come back with a vengeance if I increase my mileage too quickly or dramatically. I do all the other stuff as an extra measure (stretching, icing, rolling, etc) but none of that will stop them if I try to do more than my body is ready for.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Rest, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Proper Running Form
    • Reevaluate your running form. Are you striking on your heel? Try to hit the ground more evenly to attempt to strike more on your forefoot.
    • Running store --> Gait analysis --> New shoes, maybe inserts
    • Stretch stretch stretch. Try and improve your ankle mobility and strength. Before and after runs try and write the alphabet in the air with your toes to stretch your ankles out. Stand on a step with your feet partially over the edge and move your feet up and down, if you have shin splints this will hurt, but it will make your muscles stronger.
    • Ice your shins and calves
    • Rest
    • Get off the treadmill. Run outside in varied terrain where every single pace won't hit the same parts of your legs over and over again, as on a treadmill
    • Foam roll your shins and calves

    Source: Used to have shin splints, this is all the advice I found online and got from my doctor. Did all these things, no longer have shin splints.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    Number one for me: taking shorter strides. Running form was the start and end to my shin splints. Once I figured out that I needed to take shorter strides, my shin splints disappeared almost entirely. With stretches and rolling and icing, they don't bother me at all.


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  • Breanna Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Female
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 0 - 6 Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Rest, Taping, Stretching

    I suffered 10 weeks with shin splints, dumb i know since i should have rested them, one thing i did was tape my arches up for longer runs and after a week of rest i have done 25 minutes of hill training every week and they seem to be getting better. Also massage, stretching and ice work wonders.


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  • Andrew Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    01
    Sep2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 18+ Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Massage, Supportive Shoes

    I suffered for years. So debilitating I could hardly walk. I'm an exercise physiologist so I thought I knew exactly how to fix the problem. I tried everything I knew according to the scientific research. Footwear, ice, massage, anti-inflamms, etc etc. Whilst they helped to alleviate acute symptoms - they didn't help long-term.
    Believe it or not - NUTRITION fixed my chronic problem. I know, it sounds crazy. I eliminated grains (specifically gluten) for autoimmune disease purposes and my shin splints literally disappeared. All training variables remained the same, but the shin splints went away. I think your article is great but I just thought I'd toss nutrition into the mix as another alternative for chronic sufferers.


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  • Fubudis Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    • Male
    19
    Jun2011
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Rest, Stretching

    Stretch your calves, ankles, quads and hamstrings thoroughly pre and post workout and before bed. Scale back your running, ice your calves and ankles post workout. Foamroll and massage your calves to relieve muscle tension. Cross fiber muscle friction helps.

    Running through it is probably a bad idea.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage

    Try massaging the muscles around your shin bone with a massage rod. Did wonders for me.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage, Supportive Shoes

    Getting fitted for running shoes was a game changer. I was not only wearing the wrong style, I was also wearing the wrong size. A lot of real running stores will also offer some sort of 60-day return policy so that you can take your shoes for a spin to see if they really work for you. The girl that fitted me spent 30+ minutes having me try things on, watching me walk, run etc. Sure my shoes were $120 BUT if these work, I can always find my next pair online for cheaper.
    Also my TP foam rollers and a lacrosse ball have been amazing too.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage

    I had it back in my semi pro days. Had the girlfriend massage them out every night which was agonizing but they were gone after a month or two and haven't returned since. Didn't see anyone about it but in hindsight probably should have.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Massage,