Ice for Shin Splints

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4.6out of 5
Worsened(1)
Not improved(6)
Improved(5)
Almost cured(11)
Cured(37)
  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Supportive Shoes, Stretching, Strengthening Exercises, Proper Running Form

    Check running form, try to run on softer surfaces, maybe buy new shoes, ice for 15-20 min, strengthen anterior tibialis, and write the alphabet with your ankles. I may be missing something, but these are the main things I have done along with appropriate stretching.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Proper Running Form
      Improved
      Ice, Massage, Supportive Shoes, Stretching

    I tried different shoes, foam rolling, icing, calf stretching. What eventually helped for me was switching to forefoot/midfoot striking. Even just try it for a couple minutes, it is an immense relief. But it's pretty risky to make that big of a change in gait in a short period of time.


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  • L07 Shin Splints

    • Age n/a
    29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Orthotics, Ice, Rest, Compression

    I used to get shin splints in a big way. First, RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Then look at your shoes. It turned out I needed some serious arch support. Either a product like super feet or from a doctor. It made a huge difference.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Not Improved
      Ice, Massage, Rest

    When I was training up for Ranger School years back I was running about 20 miles a week in a pair of Brooks and developed the worst shin splints. I tried to rest, ice it, massage, and nothing really did much. The only thing that worked for me was switching to a minimalist shoe (I used nike 3.0s). The pain got a lot worse that first week I was in the nikes, but once my body adjusted it was great. I havnt had any shin or foot issues since!


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured
    • Chronicity 2 - 3 Months

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Supportive Shoes
      Improved
      Ice, Rest, Compression, Proper Running Form

    I'm not saying that minimalist shoes get rid of shin splints, but my personal experience was that my shin splints went away when I switched to them, and they haven't come back even as I transitioned back to more cushioned shoes a few years ago.

    I started running in 06, developed pretty debilitating shin splints by late 07 and over the next year went to several different specialty running stores to get fitted for more and more cushioned (and expensive) shoes. My shin splints got worse. I tried ice baths, compression wraps, trying to change my stride, dramatically cutting back my running volume, etc.

    In 08 I read a post on Reddit making fun of the way VFFs looked and saw a few comments by people saying they had fixed their shin splints. By that point I was desperate and willing to try anything. Bought a pair (cheapest running shoes I ever bought until I discovered cross country shoes years later) and within three months my shin splints were gone. The only time they ever came back was when I misplaced them a year later and did a brisk 7 miles in an old pair of aggressively cushioned shoes.

    I have no idea how or why it worked, or if it will work for other people. I do know that:
    The VFFs were extremely punishing to me as a heel striker and I quickly became a mid-foot striker.

    My pace slowed down considerably when I transitioned, as my feet were now the most sore part of my running anatomy and took a while to acclimate.

    My volume decreased significantly at first, for the same reason.

    I have long since stopped running in VFFs, switching to progressively less minimalist shoes as the years have gone by, though I do still trail run in cross country shoes. I think I've found that for me personally the less toe drop in the shoe the better, but about 8 to 10 mm of cushion is pretty nice for those long road runs.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Recovering

    Treatment Ratings

      Almost Cured
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs, Ice, Other
      Not Improved
      Compression

    I get bad shin splints but cause I play rugby, I just gotta deal with it. What's helped the most is to ice them in the morning, after working out, and before bed, along with ibuprofen 800 3x daily. I've used those compression sleeves too, but I think that's mainly placebo. When they get bad I can't squat, but can still deadlift oddly enough. If it's available, getting some ART work might help too. That was one of the more painful sessions I've had done, but you try it all to get shit fixed


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Rest, Stretching, Proper Running Form

    Forefoot running helped me with shin splints. Do stretches that focus on the shin area before and after the workout if they get worse, only after if you can deal with them. or in the worst case situation like mine was, just take a coke bottle put water in it and freeze it and put it under the shin when you watch tv or something, this should help you with the pain + the stretches. just take time off from running, i took a 2 week break till i could run again and never had problems with the shin splints again, still had the same fitness as before, just felt a little bit more hard to breath, but that wasn't really a big problem and got quickly back on track.


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other, Proper Running Form

    Other than eliminating "heel strike" (running on your heels) there are a few things that are really helpful. I run track and got shin splints a little over a year ago and the only things I have found to really help with the pain is ice messages and KT tape. If you can get your hands on any disposable paper cups fill them with water (not all the way full) and put them in the freezer (I like to make 12 or so ata time). Then after every run, take one out, rip off the bottom, and message the area of pain. It really helps to push deep with the ice making sure to message the muscle. Additionally, if you drop by any CVS you can pick up KT Tape which is an emmnse help with pain. The company's website has instructions for how to apply the tape for your area of pain. Just note that shin splints comes in two flavors- low and high (depending on the are if your shin that has the pain) so apply which ever method is for you. Lastly, stretching out your calves is really important and I would recommend getting a roller (google "the stick").


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  • 29
    Dec2015
    • Injury Status Cured

    Treatment Ratings

      Cured
      Ice, Massage, Stretching, Other
      Not Improved
      NSAIDs - Anti Inflammatory drugs

    I've been running competitive track for almost 10 years now and this is a recurring problem for me. I have super flat feet so this causes my foot to pronate (or flatten towards the inside) more than the regular person. This in turn stresses my Tibialis Posterior muscle (muscle that runs just to the inside of your shin or rather, tibia).

    Anyways I've fo